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Mammogram Day! April 29, 2011

Posted by Dev in Musings.
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Yesterday was my annual mammogram. One of those annual rituals that women of a certain age get to go through…LOL.

I got my nipples pierced in August. That particular year, I had my mammogram in July (actually, I had it in July for years because that’s my birthday month. But somewhere along the way I got off schedule and now I have it in April). It took me ages to get my courage up to get my nipples pierced but being just a few weeks post-mammogram was a motivator. I knew I would face questions from the technician and perhaps be told I had to take the jewelry out. I was glad to have eleven months to prepare for that eventuality.

When my first post-piercing mammo rolled around, the tech did ask about the rings and suggested that perhaps I should remove them? I said I’d rather not because I didn’t have the right tool with me (at that point I still had the original captive bead ring that was put in when they were pierced). She said, “Well, okay, but if the radiologist has any problems reading the film or they interfere with the mammogram in any way, you WILL have to remove them.”

Guess what? No problems at all. The rings show up as little circles that stick out from my nipple but really have no impact on the overall mammogram.

By the time of post-piercing mammogram #2 I had my gold rings in. For that one, the technician commented on how pretty they were. No more talk of taking them out.

Last year I had to switch mammogram facilities, due to change in where my gynecologist was working and insurance regulations. They obtained all my old films so of course they saw the rings but I was curious if the new tech would say anything. I actually can’t remember what happened last year so obviously it was no big deal. Yesterday the tech (same woman, as I recall) said, “Still have your nipple rings in?” and I said yes. That was that and we proceeded to talk about the lovely view out of the window of the mammogram room. (This is probably one of the very few mammogram facilities in the world that has an ocean view!)

I haven’t gotten a callback telling me I need to come in for an ultrasound or biopsy, so it seems that all is fine for another year. Phew!

For any women reading this (or for men reading who have loved ones with breasts) remember, mammograms do save lives! I know there is controversy about when to begin and how often. My personal belief is to have a baseline at age 40; frequency after age 40 should be decided in consultation with your primary care provider and based on risk factors and family history. Once you reach age 50, plan on a mammogram annually.

Now that I know (once again) I have healthy breasts, I think I’ll plan to celebrate with letting Ab have some fun tonight–his favorite activity. 🙂

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Comments»

1. Harry Haversackers - April 30, 2011

Dev,

Glad to hear that all is well in the boobies department.

I’m happy to say that Mrs. H. does as you do, and gets her magnificent DD’s checked with a mammogram regularly. There’s been one instance of breast cancer in her family and we’d all be devastated if she were to have it (or anything like it) happen to her.

I hope, if there are any of your readers – in the appropriate age group – who haven’t been getting their breasts examined, that they take the hint and make an appointment to have it done.

All the best,
Harry

Dev - May 1, 2011

Thanks, Harry. Mammos are quick and easy and to me, not painful. Yes, they squeeze a little bit but it’s over quickly and that’s it. Definitely a good health promotion activity…

L


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